Colombia’s illegal armed groups (maps)

(AGC paramilitaries (Image: YouTube)

Multiple illegal armed groups that carry out violent attacks against civilians, security forces, and oil infrastructure are active throughout Colombia.

The following maps indicate where think tank Indepaz registered and verified activity of these groups within the indicated time period.

These maps should not be used to assess future personal security risk as they represent activity in the past, and violent activity in Colombia is volatile. Furthermore, many of the illegal armed groups are active outside the indicated areas either through covert action or alliances with other illegal armed actors.

 


ELNFARC dissidents | “Puntilleros” | EPL / “Pelusos” | Caparrapos | Oficina de Envigado | Constru | Pachelly | LDNP | Cordillera | Pachenca

AGC / “Gulf Clan” activity (January 1 to June 30, 2018)

The Gaitanista Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AGC) are Colombia’s largest illegal armed group with between 3,000 and 7,000 combatants. They are called the “Gulf Clan” by the government. The group is led by dissident former members of  demobilized paramilitary umbrella organization AUC who abandoned their former group’s demobilization process between 2003 and 2006.

Click on image for interactive map and details.

(Source: Indepaz)

 


AGC / “Gulf Clan” | FARC dissidents | “Puntilleros” | EPL / “Pelusos” | Caparrapos | Oficina de Envigado | Constru | Pachelly | LDNP | Cordillera | Pachenca

ELN activity (January 2017 to June 30, 2018)

The ELN is Colombia’s last-standing Marxist guerrilla group and has been around for more than half a century. It has an estimated 3,000 armed members, mainly in the countryside.

The Marxist guerrillas’ urban war front has the capacity carry out sporadic terrorist attacks mainly on state targets or oil infrastructure targets in remote areas

Click on image for interactive map and details.

(Source: Indepaz)

 


AGC / “Gulf Clan” | ELN | “Puntilleros” | EPL / “Pelusos” | Caparrapos | Oficina de Envigado | Constru | Pachelly | LDNP | Cordillera | Pachenca

FARC dissidents activity (January 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018)

Following the demobilization of the FARC in 2017, dissidents formed groups throughout Colombia. The biggest one is the 1st Front or Southeastern Block, which controls southern Colombia. Also in the south west of Colombia dissident groups impose authority instead of the rule of law.

Other groups like in Antioquia, Arauca and Santander have rearmed having lost faith in the the peace process.

Click on image for interactive map and details.

(Source: Indepaz)

 


AGC / “Gulf Clan” | ELN | FARC dissidents | EPL / “Pelusos” | Caparrapos | Oficina de Envigado | Constru | Pachelly | LDNP | Cordillera | Pachenca

“Puntilleros” activity (January 1 and June 30, 2018)

The “Puntilleros,” the AUC dissident group that tried to collectively demobilize in 2011 when they were part of ERPAC but failed and have since rearmed under the sponsorship of jailed drug kingpins “El Loco Barrera” and “Puntilla.”

The groups are closely associated the the AGC as many leaders were part of the paramilitary groups that were part of the AUC, the now-defunct umbrella organizations of paramilitary groups between 1997 and 2006.

Click on image for interactive map and details.

(Source: Indepaz)

 


AGC / “Gulf Clan” | ELN | FARC dissidents | “Puntilleros” | Caparrapos | Oficina de Envigado | Constru | Pachelly | LDNP | Cordillera | Pachenca

EPL/ “Pelusos” activity (January 1 to June 30, 2018)

The EPL, or “Pelusos” as authorities call them, is a dissident faction of the guerrilla group that demobilized in 1991. The EPL has been at war with the ELN in the Catatumbo region since 2018, and is allegedly deeply involved in drug trafficking to Venezuela.

Click on image for interactive map and details.

(Source: Indepaz)

 


AGC / “Gulf Clan” | ELN | FARC dissidents | “Puntilleros” | EPL / “Pelusos” | Oficina de Envigado | Constru | Pachelly | LDNP | Cordillera | Pachenca

“Caparrapos” activity (January 1 to June 30, 2018)

The “Caparrapos,” or the Brigada Virgilio Peralta Arenas (BVPA) as they call themselves, is a former AGC unit that broke with the group of “Otoniel” in late 2017 and has since been vying for control over the Bajo Cauca region in the north of the Antioquia region with their former group.

Click on image for interactive map and details.

(Source: Indepaz)

 


AGC / “Gulf Clan” | ELN | FARC dissidents | “Puntilleros” | EPL / “Pelusos” | Caparrapos | Constru | Pachelly | LDNP | Cordillera | Pachenca

Oficina de Envigado activity (January 1 to June 30, 2018)

The Oficina de Envigado was formed when the Medellin Cartel united the city’s gangs as one enforcer army in the 1980s. The group became a hierarchical crime syndicate under the leadership of “Don Berna” after the death of Pablo Escobar in the early 1990s and continues to control many of the city’s extortion and money laundering activities.

Click on image for interactive map and details.

(Source: Indepaz)

 


AGC / “Gulf Clan” | ELN | FARC dissidents | “Puntilleros” | EPL / “Pelusos” | Caparrapos | Oficina de Envigado | Pachelly | LDNP | Cordillera | Pachenca

La Constru activity (January 1 to June 30, 2018)

La Constru is a group formed in 2006 by dissident members of the AUC’s Putumayo Bloc that maintained control over criminal activity on the border between the Putumayo province and Ecuador. The group previously worked together with the FARC and is believed to have teamed up with dissident members of the guerrilla group after its 2017 demobilization.

Click on image for interactive map and details.

(Source: Indepaz)

 


AGC / “Gulf Clan” | ELN | FARC dissidents | “Puntilleros” | EPL / “Pelusos” | Caparrapos | Oficina de Envigado | Constru | LDNP | Cordillera | Pachenca

“Los Pachelly” activity (January 1 to June 30, 2018)

The “Pachelly” gang is a long-time member of Medellin crime syndicate “La Oficina de Envigado” and one of the main gangs that have traditionally controlled criminal activity in the municipality of Bello.

Through an alliance with the AGC and Mexican drug trafficking organizations, the Pachelly gang has obtained control over illegal gold mining activity in Bajo Cauca and the northeast of Antioquia, making it one of the most powerful member gangs of La Oficina.

Click on image for interactive map and details.

(Source: Indepaz)

 


AGC / “Gulf Clan” | ELN | FARC dissidents | “Puntilleros” | EPL / “Pelusos” | Caparrapos | Oficina de Envigado | Constru | Pachelly | Cordillera | Pachenca

LDNP activity (January 1 to June 30, 2018)

The “Libertadores del Nordeste Presente” (LDNP) are a paramilitary group that appeared in August 2018 to oppose the regional hegemony of the AGC in the Northeast Antioquia region. They center of operation is mining town Segovia from where they have tried to assume control over illegal gold mining activity in the area.

Click on image for interactive map and details.

(Source: Indepaz)

 


AGC / “Gulf Clan” | ELN | FARC dissidents | “Puntilleros” | EPL / “Pelusos” | Caparrapos | Oficina de Envigado | Constru | Pachelly | LDNP | Pachenca

La Cordillera activity (January 1 to June 30, 2018)

“La Cordillera” is another surviving group of the AUC that demobilized between 2003 and 2006. The group of some 60 men and women is mainly active in local organized crime rackets and closely tied to local gangs, but is also believed to have control some international drug trafficking routes.

Click on image for interactive map and details.

(Source: Indepaz)

 


AGC / “Gulf Clan” | ELN | FARC dissidents | “Puntilleros” | EPL / “Pelusos” | Caparrapos | Oficina de Envigado | Constru | Pachelly | LDNP

Pachenca gang activity (January 1 to June 30, 2018)

The Pachenca gang from Santa Marta controls much of the drugs trafficking routes between the port city and La Guajira, the coastal province to the east.

Click on image for interactive map and details.

(Source: Indepaz)

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